Access Economics reports NSW

Planning dementia care for the future requires solid evidence. With this in mind Alzheimer's Australia NSW commissioned Access Economics to provide up-to-date estimates and projections of prevalence and incidence for people with dementia in NSW.

Keeping Dementia Front of Mind: Incidence and Prevalence 2009 - 2050 August 2009

Planning dementia care for the future requires solid evidence. With this in mind Alzheimer's Australia commissioned Access Economics to provide up-to-date estimates and projections of prevalence and incidence for people with dementia. The projections cover the period 2009 to 2050.

Keeping Dementia Front of Mind: Incidence and Prevalence 2009 - 2050 August 2009 (PDF)

Making choices - Future dementia care: projections, problems and preferences 2009

In commissioning this report “Making Choices” from Access Economics, Alzheimer's Australia sought primarily to contribute from a consumer perspective to the reviews set up by the Commonwealth Government and, in particular, to the important work of the National Health and Hospitals Reform Commissioner and to the evaluation of the National Dementia Initiative. 

Making choices - Future dementia care: projections, problems and preferences 2009 (PDF)

Dementia Prevalence & Incidence among Australians who do not speak English at home November 2006

Funded by Lundbeck Australia, this report estimates the number of people with dementia in culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) communities and from Indigenous communities – and predicts how these numbers will grow by the year 2050.

Dementia Prevalence & Incidence among Australians who do not speak English at home November 2006 (PDF)

Dementia Estimates & Projections : NSW & its RegionsAccess Econcomics Report February 2005

This report presents data for New South Wales and its constituent Area Health Service regions on the prevalence and incidence of dementia today, and projections for the future. 1 in 3 Australians with dementia currently live in New South Wales, around 71,360 people in 2005. This is projected to increase to over 227,200 people by 2050, more than the total number of people living with dementia across all of Australia today. In 2005 around 18,100 new cases of dementia will be diagnosed in NSW. This will also grow, to around 54,700 new cases in 2050.NSW, along with Victoria, Tasmania and South Australia, has a relatively older population than other States and Territories. As a result, NSW also has higher rates of dementia incidence and prevalence, as a percentage of their populations.

Dementia Estimates & Projections : NSW & its RegionsAccess Econcomics Report February 2005 (PDF)

 Dementia Estimates and Projections, NSW and its regions. 2005.

 NSW Dementia Statistics SummarySummary of dementia statisitcs for NSW (PDF) 2007

General findings from the Dementia Estimates and Projections, NSW and its Regions Report by Access Economics in Feburary 2005:

  • In New South Wales almost 74,000 people have a diagnosis of dementia, with 227,000 people expected to be directly affected by 2050.
  • 1 in 3 Australians with dementia live in NSW (about 73,810 people in 2006).
  • By 2050 this number will increase to more than 227, 000 in NSW.In 2006, 18, 700 new cases of dementia will be diagnosed in NSWIn 2050 this number will increase threefold to an estimated 54, 700 annually.
  • Currently around 65% of people with dementia live in metropolitan areas (about 46, 300).
  • The largest number of people with dementia lives in the Northern Sydney/Central Coast and South Eastern Sydney/Illawarra area.
  • This trend is expected to continue up to 2050. In 2005 there were 46,261 people with dementia in metropolitan areas. This number will grow to nearly 147,400 in 2050.
  • In 2005 there were more than 25,000 people with dementia in regional areas.
  • This number will grow to nearly 80,000 by 2050.
  • Of the estimated 18,100 new cases of dementia in NSW in 2005, more than 11,000 are women.
  • The majority of new cases are in people aged 75 to 89.
  • A quarter will be aged between 80 and 84. Although 65% of people with dementia live in metropolitan areas there is likely to be more rapid growth of dementia in regional areas between 2002 and 2050.
  • The greatest growth in dementia incidence will be on the North Coast.